Remuneration

That’s right. Not renumeration: remuneration.

This is probably among the most-commonly misspelled words in English, and it’s easy to understand why.

Renumeration just sounds better, mainly because a few words have that num- sound: numeral, numerical, numeracy. Not many though, feature mun-. Munificent, immune… and that’s all I can think of for now without googling.

Looking at those words which feature num- also shows us another reason for the frequency of the error: they’re all related to numbers, and so of course is the word remuneration, as it’s concerned with money.

The word comes from the Latin remunerationem, based partly on the verb munerari (to give), in turn from the noun munus, which could mean office, duty, or gift. Obviously in the case of remuneration the sense is gift (seen also in munificent, meaning very generous), but isn’t it odd that the word could also mean office or duty? (munus is also the root of the word municipal) I suppose in the early days of democracy being given a public office or duty was considered a great honour.

Such an honour perhaps, that you didn’t care about receiving any remuneration, let alone how to spell it.

22 thoughts on “Remuneration

  1. I honestly had do idea I was misspelling it all this time! I read somewhere another commonly misspelt word is separate, as people put it seperate. Now i know, it really bugs me! haha

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Never mundane! That’s why I look forward to your posts. However, it’s lunchtime in the municipal authority ‘for whom’ I work, and I have a bad case of the munchies

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s